Our Program begins with surveying and mapping of potential mosquito breeding sites and identification of species present in an area.

The next step is larva control. By monitoring the targeted breeding sites, where mosquitoes spend their juvenile stage and treating with biorational control techniques these aquatic juvenile stages are unable to develop into adult mosquitoes. This treatment coupled with adult control provides the most effective mosquito management program.

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Adult control is achieved by a coordinated application of registered insecticides near the perimeter of your home, around windows and doorways, and around bushes and trees that may be harboring adult mosquitoes.

Due to the nature of mosquito breeding and the location of several breeding areas off property we strongly recommend a concentrated mosquito program over a 4-6 month period beginning in early spring and continuing into the fall. Mosquitoes can never be eliminated from your property; however, with DeProw Services Mosquito Program you can reclaim the outdoors throughout the summer season.

Avoid Mosquito Bites to Avoid Infection

Mosquitoes represent one of the single largest threats to the health of mankind today. Human illness from West Nile virus is rare, even in areas where the virus has been reported. The chance that any one person is going to become ill from a mosquito bite is low. You can further reduce your chances of becoming ill by protecting yourself from mosquito bites. To avoid mosquito bites:

  • Apply insect repellent containing DEET (N, N-diethyl-meta-toluamide) when you’re outdoors.
  • When possible, wear long-sleeved clothes and long pants treated with repellents containing permethrin or DEET since mosquitoes may bite through thin clothing. Do not apply repellents containing permethrin directly to exposed skin. If you spray your clothing, there is no need to spray repellent containing DEET on the skin under your clothing.
  • Consider staying indoors at dawn, dusk, and in the early evening, which are peak mosquito biting times.
  • Limit the number of places available for mosquitoes to lay their eggs by eliminating standing water sources from around your home.

Check to see if there is an organized mosquito control program in your area. If no program exists, work with your local government officials to establish a program.

About West Nile Virus, the Disease, and Its Spread

West Nile virus is spread by the bite of an infected mosquito and can infect people, horses, many types of birds, and some other animals. Most people who become infected with West Nile virus will have either no symptoms or only mild ones. However, on rare occasions, West Nile virus infection can result in severe and sometimes fatal illnesses. There is no evidence to suggest that West Nile virus can be spread from person to person or from animal to person.

Prevention Q&A

Q. What can I do to reduce my risk of becoming infected with West Nile virus?
A. Here are preventive measures that you and your family can take:
Protect yourself from mosquito bites:

• Apply insect repellent sparingly to exposed skin. The more DEET a repellent contains the longer time it can protect you from mosquito bites. A higher percentage of DEET in a repellent does not mean that your protection is better, just that it will last longer. DEET concentrations higher than 50% do not increase the length of protection. Choose a repellent that provides protection for the amount of time that you will be outdoors.
• Repellents may irritate the eyes and mouth, so avoid applying repellent to the hands of children.
• Whenever you use an insecticide or insect repellent, be sure to read and follow the manufacturer’s DIRECTIONS FOR USE, as printed on the product.

• Spray clothing with repellents containing permethrin or DEET since mosquitoes may bite through thin clothing. Do not apply repellents containing permethrin directly to exposed skin. If you spray your clothing, there is no need to spray repellent containing DEET on your skin under your clothing.
• When possible, wear long-sleeved clothes and long pants when you are outdoors.
• Place mosquito netting over infant carriers when you are outdoors with infants.
• Consider staying indoors at dawn, dusk, and in the early evening, which are peak mosquito biting times.
• Install or repair windows and door screens so that mosquitoes cannot get indoors.

Help reduce the number of mosquitoes in areas outdoors where you work or play, by draining sources of standing water. In this way, you reduce the number of places mosquitoes can lay their eggs and breed.

• At least once or twice a week, empty water from flowerpots, pet food and water dishes, birdbaths, swimming pool covers, buckets, barrels, and cans.
• Check for clogged rain gutters and clean them out.
• Remove discarded tires and other items that could collect water.
• Be sure to check for containers or trash in places that may be hard to see, such as under bushes and under your home.

Note: Vitamin B and “ultrasonic” devices are NOT effective in preventing mosquito bites.